Olde English Mince Pies

Traditional Mince Pies used to contain meat, alongside the familiar fruit mixture found today.

Here is my Lancashire adaptation of Jeri Westerson’s recipe for the adventurous to try!

pie

Ingredients:

1lb lean minced beef, boiled thoroughly until reduced to small strands

4 green apples, cored, peeled and cubed into bite-size pieces

1/4lb suet, processed into fine granules

12oz raisins

12oz currants

2 lemons, with rind grated, squeezed, and chopped into small pieces

4oz brown sugar

4 tablespoons black treacle

8oz cooking sherry

8oz cider

8oz brandy

salt and pepper to taste

2 tablespoons mace

2 tablespoons allspice

2 tablespoons nutmeg

2 tablespoons ground cloves

4 tablespoons cinnamon

1lb pastry dough

flour to roll out pastry

1 tablespoon milk to glaze

nub of butter to grease pie dish

 

Method:

  1. Heat the oven 375/ 190 /Gas 5.
  2. Grease a large, deep pie dish.
  3. Place the cooked beef in large bowl.  Add the apples, suet, raisins, currants, lemons, sugar, black treacle, cider, salt, pepper, mace, allspice, nutmeg, cloves, and cinnamon.  Mix well.
  4. Allow the meat to cool. Stir in the sherry and brandy.
  5. Roll out half of the pastry on a floured surface and line the base of the pie dish. Pour in the meat mixture and press flat.
  6. Roll out the lid and seal the edges. Cut steam holes in the top of the pie crust. Glaze with milk.
  7. Bake for 30 – 45 minutes until crisp and golden brown.
  8. Cool on a rack.  Pies can be served hot or cold.

My version varies slightly from Jeri’s.  Check out the original below:

http://www.getting-medieval.com/my_weblog/2012/12/medieval-mince-pie.html

 

 

 

 

Olde English Scones

Olde English Scones

Cream_Tea[1]  Photo: Ibán Yarza

Ingredients

8oz plain flour (save a little for rolling out dough)

3 teaspoons baking powder

pinch of salt

1oz sugar

2oz dried sultanas or raisins

2oz butter (save a little for greasing tray)

1/4 pint milk

1 beaten egg (save a little for glazing)

Method

  1. Heat the oven to 450 degrees / 230 degrees / Gas 8.
  2. Lightly grease a shallow flat baking tray.
  3. Place the flour, baking powder, and salt in a bowl and stir together.
  4. Rub in the butter until the mixture looks like large breadcrumbs.
  5. Add the sugar and dried fruit.  Stir well.
  6. Mix in the beaten egg and milk to form a soft dough.
  7. Turn out on a lightly-floured surface and knead until the dough forms a large ball.
  8. Roll out to 1″ thickness.  Press out 6-8 rounds with a pastry cutter.  Place the rounds on tray.
  9. Brush with the egg glaze.  Place in the middle of a hot oven for 12 – 15 minutes until golden brown.
  10. Remove to the cooling rack.

Serve warm with butter – or cold with jam and thick clotted cream!

Olde English Treacle Toffee

Olde English Treacle Toffee

This chewy toffee is a great Halloween and Bonfire Night favorite! Try it for Thanksgiving . . .

Treacle Toffee

Ingredients

4oz butter

Knob of butter for greasing pan

8oz brown sugar

1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

4oz dark treacle

4oz golden syrup

glass of cold water

Method

  1. Melt the butter over a medium heat in a large pan.
  2. Mix in the sugar, cream of tartar, treacle, and syrup.
  3. Boil steadily but do not stir. After 10 minutes test for the soft crack (setting) by dropping a small spot of the mixture into the glass of cold water.  Repeat every few minutes until the toffee turns solid.  This may take up to 20 minutes.  The longer the mixture boils, the harder the toffee will be.
  4. Pour into a lightly-greased flat baking tray and leave to cool.
  5. When set, turn out onto a wooden board and break into small pieces with a rolling pin or toffee hammer.  Serve and enjoy.

Olde English Jam

Jam is the English version of American jelly or fruit preserves.  It can be made from a variety of fruit.

jam

Ingredients:

1lb fresh fruit (apricots, cherries, blackcurrants, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, rhubarb, etc)

3/4 pint water

1lb granulated sugar

Method:

  1. Wash (peel and stone) the fresh produce.  If the fruit is larger than a berry, cut into smaller pieces.
  2. Put the fruit and water in a large boiling pan over a low heat.
  3. Simmer gently until the fruit turns soft.
  4. Stir in the sugar.  Allow it to thoroughly dissolve.
  5. Boil rapidly until the fruit mix reaches the setting point.  Check by holding a wooden spoon horizontally over the pan – if a drop of jam holds firm at the tip it is ready to test on a cold saucer.  Add the drop to the saucer.  Push with your finger tip.  If the jam has reached setting point it will wrinkle.
  6. Spoon into warm jam jars and cover.

Tips:

  • Over-ripe fruit can prevent the jam from setting.
  • Sweeter fruits (like cherries) need less sugar than tart fruits (like blackcurrants).
  • Over-boiling the fruit takes away the flavor.
  • Burnt jam tastes disgusting!

Olde English Gingerbread

gingerbread This traditional recipe has been a great favorite since medieval times!

Ingredients

1lb honey

1lb fine white dried breadcrumbs

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon finely ground pepper

pinch of salt

butter for greasing pan

Method

  1. Lightly grease a 1″ thick shallow baking pan.
  2. Boil the honey over a medium heat and skim off the scum.
  3. Lower the heat and add the spices.
  4. Slowly add the breadcrumbs and stir well until you have an evenly-coated thick mixture.
  5. Turn the gingerbread mix into the pan.  Spread evenly. Push well into the corners.  Leave to cool.
  6. Turn out onto parchment paper and tap the base to release from the pan.
  7. Turn the gingerbread face up and cut into squares.
  8. Place a small clove in each piece.
  9. Decorate the plate with clean, dry leaves – or candy shapes.
  10. The cooled mixture can be molded like marzipan for special events!

Olde English Jam Roly-poly

A favorite pudding from childhood! Jam Roly-poly is a warm winter treat, best served with hot custard.

cake 1

Ingredients

8oz self-raising flour

4oz shredded vegetable suet

2oz caster sugar

Knob of butter

Pinch of salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 egg, mixed with 1 tablespoon of milk

6oz raspberry jam

 4 tablespoons milk

1 teaspoon icing sugar

Method

  1. Heat the oven 200C/400F/Gas Mark 6.  Grease a flat baking sheet with the knob of butter.
  2. Sift the flour into a large bowl.  Add the suet, sugar, salt, and cinnamon.  Stir.
  3. Add most of the egg mix and stir (saving two teaspoons for brushing later).
  4. Gradually mix in the milk to form a soft dough.  Kneed lightly.  Leave to rest in the bowl for 5 minutes.
  5. Roll out the dough into a thin rectangle on a floured surface.  Spread with jam, leaving a 1″ border on all sides.  Wet the edges lightly with the egg mix.
  6. Roll up into a cartwheel shape from one long end to the other.  Place the seam on the underside, flat on the baking sheet.
  7. Brush on the remainder of the egg mix.
  8. Bake for 30-40 minutes until golden brown.
  9. Dust with icing sugar.
  10. Serve piping hot.

Olde English Spotted Dick

Spotted Dick is an amusing name for a delicious suet-based fruit pudding that is best serve with custard!

Spotted Dick

Ingredients

40z fresh white breadcrumbs

3oz shredded vegetable suet

3oz plain flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

2oz sugar

4oz dried currants, raisins, or sultanas

1 lemon – grated rind and juice

1 orange – grated rind and juice

4oz milk

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

Method

1. Grease a heat-proof pudding bowl.

2. Place the breadcrumbs, suet, flour, salt, sugar, and dried fruit in a large bowl.

3. Add the lemon rind and juice, orange rind and juice, vanilla, and milk.

4. Stir well with a wooden spoon until thoroughly mixed.

5. Place in the pudding bowl.  Cover with pleated greaseproof paper and tie off with string.

6. Steam in a metal culinder or sieve over a large pan of boiling water for 1 – 2 hours, checking the water regularly, and topping up the pan so it does not boil dry.

7. Serve hot.