Olde English Rabbit Stew

Rabbit Stew is a traditional Old English dish that has always been popular with country folk.

stew

Ingredients

3lb chopped rabbit

1/2lb chopped bacon

2 chopped onions

1lb sliced mushrooms

1lb sliced carrots

2lb diced potatoes

 1 chopped garlic clove

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons ground black pepper

2oz flour

1/2 pint red wine

1/2 pint chicken stock

1 bay leaf

1 teaspoon rosemary

1 teaspoon thyme

1 teaspoon parsley

1 lemon – juice and grated rind

1/4 pint fresh cream

2 tablespoons corn starch

Method

1.  Mix the flour, salt and pepper in a large bowl.

2.  Brown the bacon on high in a large pan on the stove.  Remove and drain on kitchen paper.  Keep the fat.

3.  Place the rabbit meat in the hot bacon fat and stir until evenly brown. Remove and place on kitchen paper.  Keep the fat.

  4.  Lightly brown the potatoes and carrots in the hot fat.  Add mushrooms, onions, and garlic clove.  Stir continuously for five minutes.

5.  Add the wine, chicken stock, bay leaf, rosemary, and thyme.  Bring to the boil.

6.  Return the bacon and rabbit to the pan.  Reduce to a low heat.  Cover and simmer until the rabbit is tender (1 – 2 hours).

7. Remove the bay leaf.  Mix the cornstarch with a little water to form a smooth paste and stir in slowly to thicken the stew.  Add the parsley, lemon juice, and rind.  Blend in the cream just before serving.

* For a sweeter tangy stew, add 2 tablespoons of jam or marmalade with the wine and chicken stock.

Olde English Oat Cakes

Oat Cakes have long been a favorite cracker in the North of England and Scotland.  They are delicious served buttered, with cheese and Branston Pickle, or with chutney.  For a sweeter treat try them with berry compote, jelly, or jam!

Oatcakes

Ingredients

4oz rolled oats

1 tablespoon rolled oats

4oz whole wheat flour

4oz unsalted butter

1/2 teaspoon salt

2oz sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

3oz black treacle

Method

1.  Set oven 200c / 400f / Gas 5.

2. For triangles: Grease a sandwich tin with butter and dust lightly with a half tablespoon of oats.          For rounds: Grease a baking tray with butter and dust lightly with a half tablespoon of oats.

3. Sieve the flour, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl and stir in the oats.

4. Place the butter, black treacle, and sugar in a saucepan and melt over a low heat on the stove.

5.  Add the sieved ingredients and mix thoroughly.

6. For triangles: Press the mixture into sandwich tin and sprinkle the remaining half tablespoon of oats on top. For rounds: Roll out the mixture on floured surface and cut into circles with a biscuit cutter.  Sprinkle the remaining half tablespoon of oats on top.

7. Bake in the middle of the oven for 20 – 30 minutes until the mixture is dry and slightly brown.

8. For triangles: Cool slightly. Cut into wedges.  Remove carefully and continue cooling on a wire tray.     For rounds:  Cool slightly.  Carefully remove to a wire tray.

Olde English Fruit Fool

Need a refreshing dessert for hot summer days?  Try a chilled fruit fool as a quick, easy treat!

 Ftuit Fool

Ingredients:

1lb raspberries, gooseberries, or rhubarb

4oz sugar

Water

4oz fresh elderflowers

3oz butter

3 eggs

1/3 pint of milk or single cream

4oz sugar

1 tablespoon of vanilla

Method:

1. Prepare the fruit for stewing (wash, peel, top-and-tail as needed) and place in a medium-sized pan on stove.

2. Add the sugar, elderflowers, and sufficient water to cover the fruit.  Bring to the boil and stew until all the fruit is soft.   For a smooth texture, strain the fruit through a sieve.  For a crunchier taste, stir the mixture with a fork to soften the remaining pulp.

3. Cool in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes.

4. Over low heat melt the butter.

5. Add all the remaining ingredients and whisk continually for 8 – 10 minutes until the mixture thickens.

6. Cool in the refrigerator for at least thirty minutes.

7. Fold the cold fruit mixture carefully into the cold custard to create a marbled effect.

8. Spoon into individual serving dishes and top with fresh fruit, mint leaves, or whipped cream.

Olde English Custard

Custard was used to accompany pies and puddings in the days before ice cream!  It is still very popular today, and can be served hot or cold with a variety of delectable dishes.

custard

Ingredients:

3oz butter

3 eggs

1/3 pint of milk or single cream

4oz sugar

1 tablespoon of vanilla

Method:

1. Over a low heat melt the butter.

2. Add all the remaining ingredients and whisk continually for 8 – 10 minutes until the mixture thickens.

3. Cool slightly and place in a jug.  Serve warm.

4. For cold custard place in a covered bowl in the refrigerator until set.

Olde English Bread Pudding

 

Bread Pud

Ingredients:

12 slices white bread

Knob of butter

3 eggs

1/2 pint milk

4oz dried fruit ( currants, raisins, or sultanas)

4oz sugar

nutmeg or cinnamon

 

Method:

1. Heat the oven to 325 / 170/ Gas 3.

2. Grease a loaf tin with the knob of butter.

3. Cut the bread into triangles and place in the tin.

4. Sprinkle the dried fruit on top.

5. Whisk the eggs and milk together.

6. Add the sugar.

7. Pour over the bread.

8. Sprinkle with nutmeg or cinnamon.

9. Cook 40 – 50 minutes until golden brown.

10. Remove from the oven and serve immediately with custard, cream, or ice cream.

 

Olde English Summer Pudding

Summer Pudding is a delicious traditional treat to enjoy in warm weather!

 Summer Pudding

Ingredients:

6 slices white bread with crusts removed

Knob of butter

4oz redcurrants

4oz blackcurrants

4oz blackberries

6oz sugar

Method:

1. Grease a pudding bowl with butter.

2. Line the base and sides of the bowl with 5 of the 6 bread slices.

3. Wash all the fruit and place in a pan. Add sugar.   Over a low heat stir in the  sugar to hull the fruit to a soft consistency.  Use only its own juices.  Cool.

4. Pour this mixture into the bread bowl.

5. Add the final bread slice to form a lid.

6. Cover with a saucer and add a 1-2lb weight to press the pudding into shape.

7. Place in the refrigerator to set overnight.

8. Serve with fresh cream.

Olde English Pottage

The staple meal for most medieval folk was pottage – a stew made from whatever was available at the time.  Everything was cooked together in one large cauldron over the fire.  Pottage usually contained a mixture of meat, vegetables, herbs, pulses, and grains.  Here is a tasty modern version for you to try!

pottage Gerard Hoet

Ingredients:

1lb fully cooked meat or poultry

Good pinch of salt and pepper

2 potatoes

2 onions

2 carrots

2 sticks celery

1 leak

2 root vegetables (turnip, parsley, or swede)

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 pint chicken or beef stock

1 tablespoon parsley or thyme

1/2 pint red wine

2 tablespoons Worcester Sauce

2oz pearl barley

 

Method:

1. Chop all the meat and vegetables into large chunks.

2. Boil the olive oil in a pot until bubbling, then lower to a medium heat.

3. Add the onions, potatoes, carrots and root vegetables.  Brown until slightly softened.

4. Add the celery and leak.  Brown until slightly softened.

5. Stir in the cooked, chopped meat.  Add salt and pepper to taste.  Mix well.

6. Pour in the beef stock.  Bring to the boil stirring well.  Simmer for 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft.

7. Add the red wine and Worcester Sauce.  Simmer for an additional 20 minutes.  The mixture will reduce.

8. Stir in the pearl barley and add parsley or thyme to taste.

9. Cover and simmer for 30-40 minutes until the barley softens and the pottage thickens.

Serve with rice or fresh crusty bread!